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 Neighborhoods of Chuo:

 

Ginza (銀座) is a district of Chūō, Tokyo, located south of Yaesu and Kyōbashi, west of Tsukiji, east of Yūrakuchō and Uchisaiwaicho, and north of Shinbashi. It is known as an upmarket area of Tokyo with department stores, boutiques, restaurants and coffeehouses. It is recognized as one of the most luxurious shopping districts in the world. Many designer clothes shops such as the Gucci's flagship store are in Ginza.

 

Kyōbashi (京橋 Kyōbashi?) is a neighborhood east of Tokyo Station in Chūō, Tokyo, Japan. It is one of the city's oldest commercial districts, although it has since been eclipsed by Ginza to the south and Nihonbashi to the north. Kyōbashi and Takarachō Stations provide subway service. Its name comes from the bridge that once spanned the Kyōbashi River.

The Kyōbashi, or Capital Bridge, linked Ginza and the Kyōbashi neighborhood. Together with Nihonbashi, it was one of the famous bridges of Edo. When the river was filled in 1959, the bridge was removed. Today, a pillar stands to mark the site of the old bridge.

Nihonbashi (日本橋?, literally Japan Bridge), or Nihombashi, is a business district of Chūō, Tokyo, Japan which grew up around the bridge of the same name which has linked two sides of the Nihonbashi River at this site since the 17th century. The first wooden bridge was completed in 1603, and the current bridge made of stone dates from 1911.[1]. The district covers a large area to the north and east of the bridge, reaching Akihabara to the north and the Sumida River to the east. Ōtemachi is to the west and Yaesu and Ginza to the south.

 

Tsukiji (築地) is a district of Chūō, Tokyo, Japan, the site of the Tsukiji fish market. Literally meaning "reclaimed land," it lies near the Sumida River on land reclaimed from Tokyo Bay in the 1700s, during the Edo period.

There are also districts named Tsukiji in Kobe and Amagasaki, cities in Hyōgo Prefecture, although neither are as well known as Tokyo's.

 

Tsukishima (月島) is a place located in Chūō, Tokyo, Japan. It is an island formed of reclaimed land completed in 1892, using earth from the dredging work performed to create a shipping channel in Tokyo Bay. At this time, it was designated an area for iron-working in accordance with the Fukoku Kyōhei National Policy. The second area of reclaimed land forming the island was completed two years later in 1894. It has been said that the name (literally "moon island") was originally written using the characters 築島 which can also be read "Tsukishima" but mean "constructed island".

It is currently known for its large number of restaurants serving the local speciality, monjayaki.

Tsukishima station is served by the Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line and the Toei Subway Oedo Line.

Yaesu (八重洲?) is a neighborhood in Chūō, Tokyo, Japan, located north of Ginza, west of Nihonbashi and Kyōbashi, and adjacent to the east side of Tokyo Station. The Yaesu exit, which faces Nihonbashi, is recent and primarily provides access to the Shinkansen platforms.

The area was named after the 17th century Dutch adventurer Jan Joosten, who, for his services to Tokugawa Ieyasu, was granted a house in Edo (today's Tokyo). The area came to be called Yayosu Quay after him—his name was pronounced yan yōs'ten in Japanese—and the name exists in the name of Yaesu side of Tokyo Station. Yaesu Avenue has a monument dedicated to Jan Joosten and his life after his arrival in Japan on the Liefde with William Adams.

  
 

 

 

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