Travel Tokyo  Travel Tokyo Japan

 Information about travel, hotels, attractions, places to see, transportation, shopping, airports, tourism and sightseeing in Tokyo, Japan

@

Links@

For your information:

History

@

Historical Places:

Events

@

Tokyo Subways

Weather

Embassies

Shopping

Arts and Crafts

Sports

Customs

@

Museums

Parks and Gardens:

Temples and Shrines:

Seven Gods of Fortune

@

Setagaya

“V‰€Ž›

HOME

 Hotels Attractions Places to SeeTransportationShoppingAirportsToursTaito Districts

Adachi

Arakawa

Bunkyo

Chiyoda

Chuo

Edogawa

Itabashi

Katsushika

Kita

Koto

Minato

Meguro

Nakano

Nerima

Ota

Setagaya

Shibuya

Shinagawa

Shinjuku

Suginami

Sumida

Taito

Toshima

@

@

@

Tenno-ji - Tokyo Tourist Guide

“V‰€Ž›

Tenno-ji

Tokyo, Taito-ku, Yanaka  7-14-8 || Tel.: 03-3821-4474
@

@

@

When the Buddhist Saint Nichiren Stayed at the house of Seki Nagateru, the Lord of this area, he carved a sculpture of himself and Nagateru built a hermitage in which he enshrined the sculpture. This was the beginning of Tenno-ji Temple, which is generally said to have been established in the Muromachi period between 1391 and 1427.  The temple was however placed  it was placed under the jurisdiction of neighboring Kanfeiji in 1699.

Return to Yanaka map

 Tenno-ji was initially called Kanno-ji, but in 1833 in accordance with a decree by the Tokugawa Shogunate, its name was changed and its sect altered from the Nichiren sect of Buddhism to the Tendai sect.  During the Edo Period public lotteries (tomikuji) were held here, so along with the Ryusen-ji temple in Meguro and the Yushima Tenjin Shrine in Ueno it was famous as one of the "Three Lotteries".

@

Return to Yanaka map

Among the temples still existent in Tokyo there are few that were founded before the Edo period (1600-1868), so Tenno-ji is one of the few ancient temples left in the metropolis. However most buildings were destroyed in the Battle of Ueno in 1868. A famous pagoda survived, and it became the subject of a novella by Meiji author Koda Rohan. Regrettably this structure was destroyed in a double loverfs suicide in 1957. It was never rebuilt. Only the foundation stones are left. 

Most of the halls of the temple have been newly rebuilt in modern style – the only historical element is a large bronze Buddha dating from 1690, who sits in the open air.

Bishamonten, one of the seven Gods of Fortune, has a small hall all his own.

@

Return to Yanaka map

@

”ωΉ–ε“V

Bishamonten

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

@

         

          In Japan, Bishamonten, or just Bishamon, is thought of as an armor-clad god of warfare or warriors and a punisher of evildoers – a view that is at odds with the more pacific Buddhist king described above. Bishamon is portrayed holding a spear in one hand and a small pagoda in the other hand, the latter symbolizing the divine treasure house, whose contents he both guards and gives away. In Japanese folklore, he is one of the Japanese Seven Gods of Fortune.

Bishamon is also called Tamonten (‘½•·“V), meaning "listening to many teachings" because he is the guardian of the places where Buddha preaches. He lives half way down the side of Mount Sumeru.

          Bishamon's name in Sanskrit is Vaishravana, which means "one who hears everything in the kingdom." It is very likely that his imagery and iconography originated with the Hindu deity named Kubera / Kuvera.

           The small pagoda he often carries symbolizes the divine treasure house. He is both a protector of and dispenser of its treasure -- he shares the pagoda's vast treasures with only "the worthy."

          In Japan, as a member of the Four Heavenly Kings, he is called Tamonten (Listens to Many Teachings), and in this capacity he protects the places where Buddha preaches and listens always to Buddha's teachings. Said to live halfway down the north side of Mount Sumeru, Bishamon/Tamonten protects the north, and commands two classes of mythical spirits and demons -- the Yasha (Yaksa) and the Rasetsu (Raksha).

@

@

@

Other temples and their deities in Yanaka:

TempleDeity
Tokaku-jiFukurokuju
Seiun-jiEbisu
Shusei-inHotei
Tennou-jiBishamonten
Choan-jiJuroujin
Gokoku-inDaikokuten
BentendoBenzaiten

Return to Yanaka map

@

Tenno-ji - Tokyo Tourist Guide, “V‰€Ž›, Tokyo, Japan, city, guide, tourist, travel, hotels, flights, airfares, carhire, hirecars, cars, accommodation, books, museums, Tokyo Museums, Art Galleries, bars, nightclubs, restaurants

@

@

www.bluecrystalbeachresort.com || www.resortspuertogalera.com || www.hotelspuertogalera.com || www.resortphilippines.com || www.beachresortphilippines.com || www.worldbeachresorts.com || www.beachresortbali.com || www.travelmindoro.com || www.travelpuertogalera.com || www.puertogaleraphilippines.com || www.travelphilippines.net || www.tochigiprefecture.com || www.anopoyun.com ||